nonverbal

Brain Styles

Last week my women’s writing group held it’s first week-long ‘Summer Camp’ of events. We enjoyed 5 days of  workshops, social time and just fun events. I was really delighted by how well the whole thing came off.

Part of the week included a session on profiling fictional characters, and we shared our Myers-Briggs profiles. I always joke that I’m the most problematic of the 16 types, the INFP. Sure, I have great insight and gifts for deep thinking and empathy, but mostly, my personality type is not what recruiters are looking for. Finding ways to feel good about my inherent qualities has always been challenging.

So I was delighted to see this on BuzzFeed: (click thru to see all 17 graphs)

introvert1

I think the world is changing, and there is a rising awareness of different perceptual approaches. Maybe not in the corporate boardroom, and humans still have a long way to go when it comes to appreciating diversity on any spectrum. But we’re beginning to wake up.

But since a good portion of my people fall into the Introvert category, let’s take some time to appreciate what we’re really like.

And my favorite, all our best features!

introvert-perks

See the complete BuzzFeed post here.

 

Advertisements

Visual Information: Impact of Vacinations

In a clear and compelling illustration, these charts of disease incidence before and after the introduction of vaccines show dramatic decline in illness from measles and polio.
Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 9.44.31 AM

This data from Project Tycho and the Center for Disease Control shows the numbers of infected people by state and year, (at the scale is cases per 100,000 people.) When the vaccine is introduced there is a brief lag and then marked decline in cases.You can see more examples HERE, including hepatitus A, rubella, whooping cough and small pox.
Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 9.47.44 AM

Listen: Did You Know?

That we listen to people at a rate of 125-250 words per minute, but think at 1,000-3,000 words per minute?

That less than 2 percent of people have had any formal education on how to listen?

That images go into your long term memory, whereas words live in your short term memory?

Take a look at this infographic from Get In Front Communications for more:

Communication Takes the World Stage

I give you but a few of many thoughts on the mediasphere since the terrorist acts in Paris of last week:

Artists respond to the attack on Charlie Hebdo:

Former Nun asks “What Does this Serve?

Terry Nicholetti, actor, author and founder of Speak Out Girlfriend has worked in women’s empowerment and human services since leaving the convent years ago. She’s a dear friend of mine and woman of deep compassion and love for humanity.

As we discussed the Charlie Hebdo shootings, she asked: “what purpose does it serve to publish a cartoon that deeply offends and outrages the religious sensibilities of the largest religious group on the planet?” It’s a good question.

My answer is that the purpose is satire, for stimulation of debate in the public sphere. Terry was persistent in her concern is that publishing material known to be outrageously offensive is going to have predictable, and devastating, results. Does the presenter of such speech bear responsibility for the dreadful result?

Indeed, Pope Francis spoke to this very idea during his trip to Manila on Thursday:

“You cannot provoke, you cannot insult other people’s faith, you cannot mock it,” the pontiff said. “Freedom of speech is a right and a duty that must be displayed without offending.”

“People who speak badly about religions or other religions, who make fun of them, who make a game out of the religions of others are provocateurs,” Francis said, and went on to draw a parallel to his friend insulting his mother. “He can expect a punch. There is a limit.”

To those used to America’s free speech tradition, which champions the freedom to give offense over the right to be protected from it, Francis’s statements may sound uncomfortably similar to victim blaming. But they are actually very close to many European countries’ positions on the limits of free speech. [from VOX] 

While I am most likely to take the side of the artists in this instance, another

A Feminist Muslim’s take on Charlie Hebdo

Steph is a writer who as a teenager was a forced convert to Islam and live under as she describes it religious mysogyny. In her post on the Charlie Hebdo shootings, she speaks about the burden of those silenced by radical religious ideology enforced by violence.

I spent a good chunk of life controlled by a radical religious ideology, and another chunk too scared to talk honestly about it. My experience, and the experiences of many who are marginalised, controlled, and silenced by radical Islam, is that the figures of authority responsible for spreading the rhetoric of terrorism do indeed have power and privilege. They aggressively tout misogynistic, homophobic, xenophobic dogma, and they control individuals, families, communities, and sometimes whole states through fear. So, personally, I find living in a society where I’m free to ridicule terrorists who want to dictate the terms of free speech, and have me stripped of my autonomy and my right to laugh and poke fun, a very comforting thing indeed.

You can read her entire fascinating and provocative post at her blog,  ReImagining My Reality.

 

The West Should Examine its Conscience

In an article on CNN.com, noted philosopher Noam Chomsky challenges the eWest to examine the hypocrisy of our outrage, considering a string of reprehensible acts such as the 1999 NATO attack on Serbian media and the US led ‘War on Terror,’ which Chomsky called “Barack Obama’s global assassination campaign targeting people suspected of perhaps intending to harm us some day, and any unfortunates who happen to be nearby.”

Read the entire op-ed piece at CNN.com here.

 

One Last Thing…

The Eyes ARE the Brain

I’m a lifelong fan of the power of the visual mind. An artist since I was a child, the power and richness of imagery has always captivated me.

Although we seem to value text and numerical data over mere ‘pictures,’ over 90% of all information processed by our brains is visual. Since we perceive the world in rich, colorful moving three-dimensions, a great deal of processing is required to sort all of that data into information we can make sense of. That’s why over half of our brain is dedicated to visual processing.  The retina and optic nerve are actually extensions of the brain itself, conducting massive amounts of image processing.

The near-instantaneous speed and broad bandwidth of our visual thinking is what gives advertising and movies their mesmerizing power.

Here’s a section from a cool infographic from NoeMam Studios that does a great job of telling that story:

imageprocessbrain

Click on this image to see the entire Infographic

 Why is this important?

If you’d like to learn more, here’s a great article on the miraculous visual nervous system and how it takes the raw data of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (what we call ‘light’), collects it, and assembles it into the coherent visual world we take for granted. It really gives one a profound appreciation for the sheer processing power at work in our very own grey matter.

Stop and See the Roses

Take time to appreciate what your visual cortex does for you today, when you notice the fall colors, enjoy your child’s smile, or find your attention captured by an advertisement or book cover.

And don’t neglect to harness this awesome power in your marketing.

==============

If you’d like to talk about custom infographics for your business, please get in touch.

Lies People Tell — to Women

A new study  from University of California–Berkeley and the University of Pennsylvania asked MBA students to participate in role-plays of face-to-face negotiations, and discovered that people were significantly more likely to blatantly lie to women.

The study also indicated that participants perceived women as less competent than a man or even a hypothetical person whose gender was not revealed.

Laura Kray, the study’s author noted:

 “When people perceive someone as low in competence and easily misled, they assume the person will not scrutinize lies, and that you can get away with [lying.]

Here’s more on the subject over at Slate.com

 

The “Selfie” Phenomenon

While the self-portrait has a long and venerable place in the history of art, the democratization of media in our young century collided with our first-world self obsessions to create a robust trend.   Chosen by the OED in 2013 as Word of the Year, “selfie” has charged into the English language with remarkable vigor.

The first recorded use of the hashtag #selfie took place on Flick in 2004, but the word didn’t really catch on until 2012. Since then, the use of ‘selfie’ on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram has exploded, growing by over 17,000 percent.

Consider these stats:

selfiestats

Click on the above to see the whole graphic, which is chock-full of amazing selfie info!

Now we have smart phones specifically designed for taking selfies, including this one from SONY, who created the info graphics in this blog.

And feel free to post your favorite selfie in the comments below.

Here’s my latest favorite:

I grow broccoli, therefore I am.

Non-Verbal Olympic Protests Fly Below Radar

2014-winter-olympics-5710368030588928-hpThe beauty of visual communication is the powerful impact of a glance. In a fraction of a second our big visual brains read and interpret nonverbal messages like shape and color and symbol.

Google made a big statement today without saying a word. They posted a google doodle made of Olympic winter sport figures on the colors of the rainbow. They did reinforce it with a quote from the Olympic Charter that leaves little doubt of their intention:

“The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play.”

la-sp-sn-pussy-riot-homage-alexey-sobolev-2014-001In a country struggling to define the rights of political and artistic  speech it can permit, Russian snowboarder Alexey Sobolev plainly displayed the bottom of his snowboard, painted with what is clearly an homage to the outlawed punk rock band Pussy Riot, whose knit masks have become a signature of their protests.

Visual statements like these speed messages to the brain and evade the censors, at least for a while. The power of image cannot be denied. Are you using your visual messages to their fullest advantage in your communications?