creativity

17 Great Ideas for Facebook Marketing

facebook-iconFrom Kim Garst & Boom Social

1. Pose a problem and ask for advice

can-you-help-signPeople LOVE to answer questions and to help solve problems.
Also, if you ask a question that may also help THEM with a problem, they will be grateful for the help!

2. A contest post

Everyone loves a good contest! And there are a ton of great contest apps out there that you can use to run your contest AND grab emails to add to your list as well!

3. Run a poll

Polls are great not only for generating discussion but for gaining valuable insights from your audience.
Here is a link that will take you directly to Facebook’s poll app.

4. Share the results of your poll!

If your poll collected data that would be interesting to your audience, share the results in a separate Facebook post. One strategy I have seen some business owners using is offering the results in a free downloadable report (in exchange for an email address, of course!).

5. Share inspirational images

If you follow me on Facebook, you know this is a strategy I use every single day! There is so much negativity in the world (and on Facebook).

6. Fill in the blank

I am not exactly sure what it is about fill in the blank posts, but people just love them! You can rephrase just about any question as a fill in the blank, and they often receive more engagement than basic questions. Test this out for yourself!

7. Follow Friday

Give your fans the opportunity to share a link to their website or Facebook Page; not only do they get the chance to showcase their business or products, but they can meet new people and make new connections.

8. A seasonal post

Share a holiday picture, quote or greeting centered around an upcoming holiday. Try to add a personal touch, if possible. This reminds your fans that you are a real person!

9. Blog post excerpts

I see many business owners posting links to their blog posts, without including any additional context. When sharing a blog post, be sure to include a backstory or short excerpt from the post so your fans know what to expect when they click on the link.

10. Fan-only discount

Offer your Facebook fans an exclusive discount, just for being a fan!
Use an image to promote the discount, if possible. These are better for grabbing the attention of your fans and for getting more shares.

11. Cross-promote with someone else in your niche

Team up with a business that offers a complimentary product or service, and help cross-promote each other. Tag each other in Facebook status posts, recommend that your fans ‘like’ each other’s Pages, or simply share each other’s content.

12. Fan challenge

Post a group challenge for your fans…sometimes doing something as a group can feel less overwhelming than doing it alone! Some examples include:

  • 30-days to a more organized house (post a daily organization tip)
  • Gain 1,000 fans/likes/comments/followers – give actionable tips for increasing followers and comments

13. Link to a tutorial

Give your fans a step-by-step guide or tutorial for how to do something.
These types of posts are GREAT for getting engagement, especially click-throughs and shares!

14. An expert tip

Share a tip from an industry expert for solving a common problem or overcoming a challenge.
The expert could even be YOU!

15. A personal post

This is where you, as a small business owner, have an inherent advantage.
Don’t be afraid to post a personal photo or story from time to time to differentiate yourself from the big brands your fans also follow.

16. Be imperfect

Who ever said we need to perfect in order for people to like us?
Don’t be afraid to share struggles or vulnerabilities from time to time to show you are a real person.
This is a great way to make your brand more personable and more relatable!

17. Share a picture of your business, employees
or office…

…makes your business so much more relatable!
Knowing there are real people behind your brand will go a long way to building trust and relationships.

Christmas Time Blessing to All

Advertising can indeed be a thing of beauty.

Enjoy this beautifully told tale of friendship, gifts and shared holidays:

This animated holiday ad was created for John Lewis,the UK retailer by Laurent Simon and Aidan McClure of DDB Worldwide. I highly recommend watching the Behind the Scenes video. It’s a combination of stop-motion and hand drawn animation that’s quite extraordinarily detailed.

Brain Styles

Last week my women’s writing group held it’s first week-long ‘Summer Camp’ of events. We enjoyed 5 days of  workshops, social time and just fun events. I was really delighted by how well the whole thing came off.

Part of the week included a session on profiling fictional characters, and we shared our Myers-Briggs profiles. I always joke that I’m the most problematic of the 16 types, the INFP. Sure, I have great insight and gifts for deep thinking and empathy, but mostly, my personality type is not what recruiters are looking for. Finding ways to feel good about my inherent qualities has always been challenging.

So I was delighted to see this on BuzzFeed: (click thru to see all 17 graphs)

introvert1

I think the world is changing, and there is a rising awareness of different perceptual approaches. Maybe not in the corporate boardroom, and humans still have a long way to go when it comes to appreciating diversity on any spectrum. But we’re beginning to wake up.

But since a good portion of my people fall into the Introvert category, let’s take some time to appreciate what we’re really like.

And my favorite, all our best features!

introvert-perks

See the complete BuzzFeed post here.

 

Creativity as Dialog

According to the New York Times, we are watching the end of the lone genius. I’ll be the first to agree that the isolated creative is a myth that has outlived its usefulness. Too many depictions of a tormented Vincent Van Gogh, a drunken and depressed Hemingway, even Newton as the singular discoverer, who was building on the work of others.

An article by Joshua Wolf Shenk in today’s NYT, The End of Genius, deftly unwraps the modern construct of our mythical loner. (Shenk writes more about the brilliance of creative pairs in the Atlantic, HERE.) The word originally meant “a tutelary god or spirit given to every person at birth” – a Muse as it were. In our modernity we have apparently absorbed this creative god and ascribed its qualities to our individual selves.

 

Now the creative network is emerging as a more useful model of the process.  Certainly  the internet and virtual communication has enhanced our ability to collaborate in teams and groups. We have crowd-sourced encyclopedias, music written and produced by partners who have never met, and ease of collaboration via the media that gives us instant contact.

Of course, this is nothing new.  All creative work builds on what came before. But we are  thinking about this differently. We’re evolving the way we inhabit our creative identity.

So let’s talk about it:

  • Do you work with a creative partner?
  • Do you use technology to collaborate?
  • Does the media influence your creative product?