GENDER & COMMUNICATION

New Survey on Feminism

New survey on feminism spotlights issues of exclusion

As reported on NY Times’ Women in theWorld, recent research conducted by SheKnows Media  about women’s relationship with Feminism reveals, among other things, that black women and conservative moms are less likely to identify as Feminists.

Long story short: it’s the intersectional* disconnect that undermines the movement’s goals to unite women in combatting misogyny and oppression.

*(Intersectionality is the term how sexism is experienced differently by women of color, poor women, queer women, women with disabilities, etc.)

The research suggests that the movement should emphasize inclusiveness, including men, and that “white feminists should make a point to better understand and include the struggles of non-white women.”

Read the whole story at #TheFWord

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Brain Styles

Last week my women’s writing group held it’s first week-long ‘Summer Camp’ of events. We enjoyed 5 days of  workshops, social time and just fun events. I was really delighted by how well the whole thing came off.

Part of the week included a session on profiling fictional characters, and we shared our Myers-Briggs profiles. I always joke that I’m the most problematic of the 16 types, the INFP. Sure, I have great insight and gifts for deep thinking and empathy, but mostly, my personality type is not what recruiters are looking for. Finding ways to feel good about my inherent qualities has always been challenging.

So I was delighted to see this on BuzzFeed: (click thru to see all 17 graphs)

introvert1

I think the world is changing, and there is a rising awareness of different perceptual approaches. Maybe not in the corporate boardroom, and humans still have a long way to go when it comes to appreciating diversity on any spectrum. But we’re beginning to wake up.

But since a good portion of my people fall into the Introvert category, let’s take some time to appreciate what we’re really like.

And my favorite, all our best features!

introvert-perks

See the complete BuzzFeed post here.

 

Brand Responds to Social Media

upforwhateverAnheuser-Busch’s effort to engage social media got them in  hot water. Tapping into that legendary ability of alcohol to reduce inhibitions, Bud Light printed this on their labels:

the perfect beer for removing ‘no’
from your vocabulary for the night

No doubt it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Part of the #UpForWhatever campaign, the slogan is one of 140 different messages that are followed by “The perfect beer for whatever happens.”

The twitterverse erupted in criticism, citing issues of consent and college rape, as well as drunk driving and other questionable behaviors that the tagline could be condoning.  Ere long, Anheuser Busch issued an official statement within hours of widely read Mashable post:

Bud Light Vice President Alexander Lambrecht delivered a statement to Mashable stating that “The Bud Light Up for Whatever campaign, now in its second year, has inspired millions of consumers to engage with our brand in a positive and light-hearted way. In this spirit, we created more than 140 different scroll messages intended to encourage spontaneous fun. It’s clear that this message missed the mark, and we regret it. We would never condone disrespectful or irresponsible behavior.”

However, no effort was made to remove existing bottles from circulation. The New York Times suggests they might become collectibles.

According to the Washington Post, former VP of communication Franzine Katz, who resigned in 2009 and sued the brewer for sex discrimination (she was paid far less than half of the male VPs), learned of the faux-pas from her 20 something daughter. Her reaction?

“Oh my God, are they kidding?”

The current communication head, also female, engaged in twitter bickering, calling the slogan “an honest mistake.”

Communication Takes the World Stage

I give you but a few of many thoughts on the mediasphere since the terrorist acts in Paris of last week:

Artists respond to the attack on Charlie Hebdo:

Former Nun asks “What Does this Serve?

Terry Nicholetti, actor, author and founder of Speak Out Girlfriend has worked in women’s empowerment and human services since leaving the convent years ago. She’s a dear friend of mine and woman of deep compassion and love for humanity.

As we discussed the Charlie Hebdo shootings, she asked: “what purpose does it serve to publish a cartoon that deeply offends and outrages the religious sensibilities of the largest religious group on the planet?” It’s a good question.

My answer is that the purpose is satire, for stimulation of debate in the public sphere. Terry was persistent in her concern is that publishing material known to be outrageously offensive is going to have predictable, and devastating, results. Does the presenter of such speech bear responsibility for the dreadful result?

Indeed, Pope Francis spoke to this very idea during his trip to Manila on Thursday:

“You cannot provoke, you cannot insult other people’s faith, you cannot mock it,” the pontiff said. “Freedom of speech is a right and a duty that must be displayed without offending.”

“People who speak badly about religions or other religions, who make fun of them, who make a game out of the religions of others are provocateurs,” Francis said, and went on to draw a parallel to his friend insulting his mother. “He can expect a punch. There is a limit.”

To those used to America’s free speech tradition, which champions the freedom to give offense over the right to be protected from it, Francis’s statements may sound uncomfortably similar to victim blaming. But they are actually very close to many European countries’ positions on the limits of free speech. [from VOX] 

While I am most likely to take the side of the artists in this instance, another

A Feminist Muslim’s take on Charlie Hebdo

Steph is a writer who as a teenager was a forced convert to Islam and live under as she describes it religious mysogyny. In her post on the Charlie Hebdo shootings, she speaks about the burden of those silenced by radical religious ideology enforced by violence.

I spent a good chunk of life controlled by a radical religious ideology, and another chunk too scared to talk honestly about it. My experience, and the experiences of many who are marginalised, controlled, and silenced by radical Islam, is that the figures of authority responsible for spreading the rhetoric of terrorism do indeed have power and privilege. They aggressively tout misogynistic, homophobic, xenophobic dogma, and they control individuals, families, communities, and sometimes whole states through fear. So, personally, I find living in a society where I’m free to ridicule terrorists who want to dictate the terms of free speech, and have me stripped of my autonomy and my right to laugh and poke fun, a very comforting thing indeed.

You can read her entire fascinating and provocative post at her blog,  ReImagining My Reality.

 

The West Should Examine its Conscience

In an article on CNN.com, noted philosopher Noam Chomsky challenges the eWest to examine the hypocrisy of our outrage, considering a string of reprehensible acts such as the 1999 NATO attack on Serbian media and the US led ‘War on Terror,’ which Chomsky called “Barack Obama’s global assassination campaign targeting people suspected of perhaps intending to harm us some day, and any unfortunates who happen to be nearby.”

Read the entire op-ed piece at CNN.com here.

 

One Last Thing…

Lies People Tell — to Women

A new study  from University of California–Berkeley and the University of Pennsylvania asked MBA students to participate in role-plays of face-to-face negotiations, and discovered that people were significantly more likely to blatantly lie to women.

The study also indicated that participants perceived women as less competent than a man or even a hypothetical person whose gender was not revealed.

Laura Kray, the study’s author noted:

 “When people perceive someone as low in competence and easily misled, they assume the person will not scrutinize lies, and that you can get away with [lying.]

Here’s more on the subject over at Slate.com